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Mental health

Mental health problems are as common among students as they are in the general population. But it's not just students who have a diagnosed mental health condition that can benefit from counselling.
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For crisis mental health help in Cambridgeshire

If you, or someone you know, is in a mental health crisis and needs urgent mental health help, call 111 and press option 2 when prompted for the mental health service. This is open all day and all night, and is available to anyone of any age.


When to get help

It's normal to feel down, anxious or stressed from time to time, but if these feelings affect your daily activities, including your studies, or don't go away after a couple of weeks, get help.

Signs of depression and anxiety include:

  • feeling low
  • feeling more anxious or agitated than usual
  • losing interest in life
  • losing motivation

Some people also:

  • put on or lose weight
  • stop caring about the way they look or about keeping clean
  • do too much work
  • stop attending lectures
  • become withdrawn
  • have sleep problems
  • Where to go for help


Talk to someone

Telling someone how you feel, whether it's a friend, counsellor or doctor, may bring an immediate sense of relief.

It's a good idea to talk to someone you trust first, such as a friend, member of your family or a tutor.

This is especially important if your studies are being affected. Many mild mental health problems can be resolved this way.


University counselling services

Cambridge University has it's open counselling service, which you can access through this link. You can find out what they offer and how to make an appointment and this free service in universities is available to both undergraduates and postgraduates.


Online self-help

There are also online self-help services you may like to explore, such as NHS Choices' Moodzone and the Students Against Depression website.


When to see your GP

For more serious or longer-lasting mental health symptoms, see your GP as you may need prescribed treatment or referral to a specialist.

If you have or develop a mental health condition that requires treatment, it's important to arrange continuity of care between your college doctor and your family GP.

A mental health adviser can support this communication. Your condition may worsen if moving between university and home results in a gap in treatment.


Therapy and counselling

Counselling and cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) offers an opportunity to explore the underlying issues of your unhappiness or any worries you have in a safe environment, including helping you develop ways of coping.

As well as university or college counselling services, you might be able to refer yourself for NHS counselling. Search for psychological therapy services to find out what's available in your area.  

The University Mental Health Advisers Network (UMHAN) represents the network of mental health advisers working in higher education dedicated to providing practical support to students experiencing mental health difficulties.

06/11/2019